Italian bikescapes: visual chronicles of lonely bikes throughout Italy

(updated April 17, June 2 and June 18, 2014)

We have a weak spot for lonely bikes. Bicycles that act as the main characters in beautiful settings throughout the scenic towns and villages of Italy. Urban, practical or whimsical bicycles, decorated with flowers, standing guard in front of monuments, visiting markets, or just resting, waiting for future adventures

Bicycles that seem to tell a story of their own, as they take in the history that surrounds them. They took someone on a journey and were then left behind, almost forgotten…until the next trip. And what better way to discover the country than by bike, exploring Italy’s charming little villages and hidden treasures, while soaking in the beautiful scenery and history.

Patio in Rome.



 

Alberobello, Puglia.

 

Puglia

 

Sutri, Lazio.

 

Monterosso, Cinque Terre. Photo © Slow Italy

Monterosso, Cinque Terre. Photo © Slow Italy

 

Locorotondo, Puglia.

 

Tropea, Calabria

Tropea, Calabria

 

Florence. Photo ©  Joaquin Escardo.

Florence. Photo © Joaquin Escardo.

 

Campo de' Fiori, Rome.

 

Anzio, Lazio. Photo © Slow Italy

 

Trastevere, Rome.

 

Via del Governo Vecchio, Rome. Photo © Slow Italy.

Via del Governo Vecchio, Rome. Photo © Slow Italy.

 
Flower bike in Rome. Photo by Audet Natalie.

 

Lucca

 

Rome. Photo by Laura Di Pasquale.

Rome. Photo by Laura Di Pasquale.

 

Cortona, Tuscany.

 

Monterosso al mare, Cinque Terre.

 

Burano, Venice

 

Burano, Venice

 

Chiesa Santa Barbara dei Librai, Rome.

 

Florence

 

Lucca. Photo © Graeme Lee Pollard.

Lucca. Photo © Graeme Lee Pollard.

 

Pienza. Photo by Ronald Venezie.

Pienza. Photo by Ronald Venezie.

 

Florence. Photo by Lori Harris.

Florence. Photo by Lori Harris.

 

Volterra. Photo by Patricia Michelle Shoffner.

Volterra. Photo by Patricia Michelle Shoffner.

 

Tricycle in Lucca

 

Bibbona, Tuscany.

 

Mantova.

 

Floral bike, right near the Palazzo vecchio, Florence. Photo by Dianne Fournier-Bostic.

 

Lucca. Photo by Tim Arai.

Lucca. Photo by Tim Arai.

 

 

Lavander bike, Florence.

 

Bassano del Grappa. Photo by Steve Wright.

Bassano del Grappa. Photo by Steve Wright.


 

Florence. Photo by Maria Giovanna Angherà-Muñoz.

Florence. Photo by Maria Giovanna Angherà-Muñoz.

 

Modena.

Modena. Photo by Maria Giovanna Angherà-Muñoz.

 

Pienza. Photo by Marta Smith Higgs.

Pienza. Photo by Marta Smith Higgs.

 

Bologna.

 

Lonely bike in Rome. Photo by Agnieszka Żelwetro.

Lonely bike in Rome. Photo by Agnieszka Żelwetro.

 

Bamboo bike, Siena.

 

Zebra bike, Florence.

 

Pigneto, Rome.

 

Vigevano, Lombardy

 

Old Genova.

 

Piazza della Signoria, Florence. Photo by Giuseppe Moscato. www.giuseppemoscato.com

 

Florence. Photo by LJ Photo.

 

Florence. Photo by Amy Uy (Miley Moomoo).

Florence. Photo by Amy Uy (Miley Moomoo).

 

Lucignano d'Asso. Photo by Pat Urban.

Lucignano d’Asso. Photo by Pat Urban.

 

San Gimignano. Photo by Linda Panozzo.

San Gimignano. Photo by Linda Panozzo.

 

Across the Burian Bar, Florence. Photo by Sean Ragusa.

Across the Burian Bar, Florence. Photo by Sean Ragusa.


 

Lucca. Photo © Graeme Lee Pollard.

Palermo. Photo © Graeme Lee Pollard.




 

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Photo credits (top to bottom):  Patio in Rome by Perrimoon; Alberobello by ricmartinez; Puglia by Simone Zucchelli; Sutri by Y♥YNTL; Locorotondo by routard05; Tropea by mrholle; Watermelon bike © Joaquin Escardo; Campo de’ Fiori by Andrea S; Anzio  © Slow Italy; Trastevere by Reina Cañi; Lucca by p medved; Cortona by gre.ceres; Monterosso al Mare by Pablo Pecora; Burano (pink) by yahti.com; Burano (yellow) by PAVDW; Chiesa Santa Barbara by eltercero; Florence by bubbo.etsy.com; Florence by Lori Harris; Lucca by Perrimoon; Bibbona by Nichelino; Mantova by Ostrosky photos; Floral bike by Dianne Fournier-Bostic; Flower bike by Darion Brickell; Lavander bike by R Alescio; Bologna by Bart Bernardez; Bamboo bike by DarkB4Dawn; Zebra bike by Perrimoon; Pigneto Rome by Agostino Zamboni; Vigevano by bibendum84; Old Genova by Artur Staszewski; Piazza della Signoria by Giuseppe Moscato; Florence by LJ Photo; Florence bike by Sean Ragusa; Lucca by Graeme Lee Pollard.

New Florence Opera House revives the theater as envisioned by the ancient Greeks

New Florence Opera House
Today the New Florence Opera Theater will open its doors for an extraordinary public concert by Zubin Mehta. With its rectangular geometric structure and latest technologies the new opera house is one of the most modern opera houses in the world, uniting modernity and antiquity, vision and tradition, in the city that gave birth to the first opera in the 1600s.

New Florence Opera House

The New Opera House was conceived to take on all those functions of the theater as it was envisioned by the ancient Greeks, making it a cultural center, where music, arts, education and entertainment converge. For this reason the venue will be open and accessible to the public during daytime hours as well.  The bookshop and café will be always open and families can go for a walk, wander among the fountains, or meet with friends on the grounds. The piazza is the largest in Florence and one of the largest in Italy, giving an immediate identity to the space as a “factory” for performance and music. The theatre will be open to classical music but also to pop, theatrical productions, film, meetings and conferences, making it a central place in the life of city and its inhabitants.

Located on viale Fratelli Rosselli, between Porta al Prato and the Cascine, the massive new opera house was designed by Paolo Desideri of Abdr Architetti Associati. The project was undertaken by the Presidenza del Consiglio dei Ministri with funds made available for the celebration of the 150th anniversary of the unification of Italy and with contributions from the Regione Toscana and the city of Florence.

Once complete, the building will house three concert halls, allowing to entertain audiences of up to 4,800 in three separate, simultaneous performances. The acoustics, which have been superintended by the German team Müller-BBM, will be of an extraordinary quality. The final touches to the building are scheduled to begin after January 1, 2012, while the official opening is planned for November 24, 2012.

Tonight’s concert will be the first in a series of great concerts for a 10 days of celebrations that will see some of the world’s most celebrated conductors and soloists together with the artists of the Maggio: Zubin Mehta, Stefano Bollani, Claudio Abbado, András Schiff, Fabio Luisi, Rudolf Buchbinder, Leonidas Kavakos, Patrizia Ciofi, Fabio Sartori…

The inaugural events will conclude on New Year’s Eve with a sparkling festival starting with a concert of Italian operatic repertory with Mehta conducting. This will be the beginning of a new tradition that will come a few hours before the musical salutes to the new year organized by the Teatro La Fenice in Venice and the Musikverein in Vienna.

The opening night of the New Florence Opera House will be broadcasted live today on RAI5 at 20:15.

Info: www.maggiofiorentino.com

See also:

Five major Italian opera houses

Top 10 major opera and music festivals in Italy

Verismo in Italian opera

Italian opera