21 unusual photos that will make you want to go (back) to Pisa

Pisa beyond the obvious and the cliches. The famous sights photographed from a not so usual perspective and other off the beaten tourist track points of interest.

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Pisa Duomo as seen from the Baptistery. Photo by Bernd Thaller.

 

Camposanto Cemetery, Pisa. Photo © Slow Italy

Camposanto Cemetery, Pisa. The cemetery of the noble and illustrious citizens of Pisa with some remarkable funerary monuments. Photo © Slow Italy



Detail of "The Science". Camposanto monumentale di Pisa. Monumental cemetery of Pisa (Italy). Dettaglio dalla tomba di Ottaviano Fabrizio Mossotti (1791 - 1863), matematico, fisico e astronomo italiano. Photo © Slow Italy

Detail of “The Science”. Camposanto Monumental Cemetery of Pisa. Tomb of Ottaviano Fabrizio Mossotti (1791 – 1863), Italian mathematician, physicist and astronomer.
Photo © Slow Italy

 

Santa Maria della Spina Church. Photo by r.g-s

Santa Maria della Spina Church. For decades the church contained one of the thorns (spina) from Christ’s crown, hence its name. Photo by r.g-s

 

Tomb of the famous Pisan mathematician Leonardo Fibonacci, inventor of the sequence of Fibonacci numbers. Fibonacci also introduced the Hindu-Arabic numeral system we still use today to the Western world. He is considered to be the most talented Western mathematician of the Middle Ages.

Tomb of the famous Pisan mathematician Leonardo Fibonacci (1170 – 1250), inventor of the sequence of Fibonacci numbers. Fibonacci also introduced the Hindu-Arabic numeral system to the Western world, the same system we still use today. He is considered to be the most talented Western mathematician of the Middle Ages. Photo © Slow Italy

 

Detail of "The Science". Camposanto Monumental Cemetery of Pisa. Tomb of Ottaviano Fabrizio Mossotti (1791 - 1863), Italian mathematician, physicist and astronomer. Photo © Slow Italy

Another detail of “The Science”. Camposanto Monumental Cemetery of Pisa. Tomb of Ottaviano Fabrizio Mossotti (1791 – 1863), Italian mathematician, physicist and astronomer.
Photo © Slow Italy

 

Entrance to the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Photo © Slow Italy

Entrance to the Leaning Tower of Pisa.
While it is by far the most famous tilting tower wordwide, it is not the only leaning tower in Pisa. There are two more in Pisa, namely the Campanile of San Nicola and the Campanile of San Michele degli Scalzi and seven more in Italy. Photo © Slow Italy

 

 

Photo by llee_wu.

Photo by llee_wu.

 

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Detail of the Duomo’s ceiling, Pisa. Photo © Slow Italy

 

Pisa Duomo, interior. Photo © Slow Italy

Pisa Duomo, interior. Photo © Slow Italy

 

Galileo's lamp (1587) in the Duomo, Pisa. Legend has it that the Pisan scientist understood the principle of the pendulum from the swinging of the lamp. Photo by Baljeet Dhillon.

Galileo’s lamp (1587) in the Duomo, Pisa. It is said that the Pisan scientist understood the principle of the pendulum from the swinging of the lamp. He realized that the oscillations always took the same amount of time whatever their range. He later applied the measurement of its movement to the measurement of time. He also carried out experiments from the Leaning Tower of Pisa to study the Laws of Gravitation
Photo © Baljeet Dhillon.

 

The Leaning Tower of Pisa. Photo by Izarbeltza

The Leaning Tower of Pisa. Photo by Izarbeltza
The Tower measures 58.36m in height, which appears to be a random number, but which actually corresponds to exactly 100 “braccia pisane” (Pisan cubits). In Medieval times there was no unity in the metric system and each city-state, Florence, Pisa and Arezzo, had their own metric system with a different value for the “braccio” and other units.

 

Lucifer, detail of the fresco "Hell" by Buffalmacco, Camposanto Cemetery, Pisa. Photo © Slow Italy.

Lucifer, detail of the fresco “Hell” by Buffalmacco, Camposanto Monumental Cemetery, Pisa. Photo © Slow Italy.

 

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Piazza dei Miracoli, with the shadow of the leaning tower on the Duomo, and the Baptistery in the background. Photo © Slow Italy

 

Baptistery, Pisa. Photo by llee_wu.

Baptistery with the Duomo and Leaning Tower in the background, Pisa. Photo by llee_wu.

 

View over Pisa from the Leaning Tower. Photo © Slow Italy.

View over Pisa from the Leaning Tower. Photo © Slow Italy.

 

The Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa is one of the most famous and prestigious universities of Italy. It was founded in 1810 by Napoleon as a branch of the École Normale Supérieure in Paris. Detail from a photo by chuci.

The Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa on Piazza dei Cavalieri in Pisa is one of the most famous and prestigious universities of Italy. It was founded in 1810 by Napoleonic decree as a branch of the École Normale Supérieure in Paris. It is housed in Palazzo della Carovana, built by Vasari in 1562. Carducci, the first Italian to win the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1907, graduated from the Scuola Normale Superiore in 1856. Piazza dei Cavalieri is the second most important square to visit in Pisa. During the Pisan Republic it was the center of the political power.
Detail from a photo by chuci.

 

The entrance door of the duomo is adorned with many decorations among which a small lizard. According to the legend touching the lizard brings good luck especially to students about the sit their final high school exams. Photo © Laura Epifani.

The entrance door of the duomo is adorned with various decorations among which a small lizard. According to the legend touching the lizard brings good luck especially to students about the sit their final high school exams.
Photo © Laura Epifani.


Palazzo Agostini, built in the 14th century, is one of the oldest palazzi in Pisa. It houses the Caffè dell'Ussero (founded in 1775) and used to house the oldest cinema in Italy, closed in 2011. It is one of the most important examples of civil gothic architecture in Tuscany. Photo by Lucarelli

Palazzo Agostini, built in the 14th century, is one of the oldest palazzi in Pisa. It houses the Caffè dell’Ussero (founded in 1775) and used to house the oldest cinema in Italy, closed in 2011. It is one of the most important examples of civil gothic architecture in Tuscany.
Photo by Lucarelli

 

Porta Nuova, Pisa. Photo by llee_wu

Porta Nuova, Pisa. When walking through the gate there is a point where all four monuments of Piazza dei Miracoli are visible at a single glance. It is this view that made Gabriele d’Annunzio scream: “Questo è un miracolo!” (this is a miracle), hence the name.
Photo by llee_wu

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